The Bronx w/ Dave Hause & The Mermaid

Tuesday April 4th

Door

8pm - 19+

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MRG Concerts West presents:
The Bronx with Dave Hause and The Mermaid & The Spitfires

Tuesday, April 4 at The Biltmore Cabaret

Doors at 8pm – 19+

Tickets on sale this Wednesday at 10am PST at http://ticketf.ly/2kl7iAd

The Bronx
The Bronx’s swaggering interpretation of hardcore punk found them a quick audience in Los Angeles, where guitarist Joby J. Ford, bassist James Tweedy, vocalist Matt Caughthran, and drummer Jorma Vik founded the band in 2002. Known for a blistering live show, the quintet attracted attention from major labels after only a handful of performances. An offer from Island/Def Jam materialized after the Bronx’s 12th gig, but the band decided to issue several recordings on its own label, White Drugs, before partnering with a major. Former Guns N’ Roses guitarist Gilby Clarke helped the Bronx compose an intense rock sound for their first demo, and the band’s debut, The Bronx, appeared in August 2003 via the Ferret Records label. Three years later, a second self-titled album marked the band’s first effort for Island Records, and the band supported its release by joining Priestess, the Riverboat Gamblers, and Wires on Fire on the WHODOYOUVOODOO Tour.
The quintet then parted ways with Island and issued a third eponymous release, unofficially known as The Bronx III, with help from Original Signal Recordings. Also in 2006, after being asked to play an acoustic set, the Bronx gave their sound a new spin, shifting from hardcore to Latin sounds. This led to the formation of alter ego band Mariachi el Bronx, who made their recorded debut in 2009. In 2013, a fourth volume of proper Bronx material arrived. IV leaned more toward a polished hard rock approach than the group’s earlier, punkier sound. ~ Andrew Leahey & MacKenzie Wilson, Rovi

Dave Hause
“The way we learned to live is fading fast/I guess we never bargained for a crash.”

For Dave Hause the American dream is a broken promise, a childhood ideal that has been shattered by the reality of the past two decades. On the musician’s second solo album, Devour, Hause scours the foundation of that crumbled dream in an attempt to discover how everything we believed growing up could have turned out so differently. The album, initially written to become the third record from Hause’s rock band The Loved Ones, follows his 2011 solo debut Resolutions, a disc that allowed the musician to understand his potential as his own artist.

As Hause, a Philadelphia native, began penning new music for a new album from The Loved Ones, it became clear that the group, who had taken a break after their second album, had stalled. These songs, however, which showcased a clear thematic journey, were meant to be vocalized by Hause and over the past few years he transformed them into Devour. Hause solidified the album’s sequence before even going into the studio, aiming to craft a narrative arc that drove the album from its dark, heavy first half into a lighter, more hopeful tone. A thematic line of melody runs through the songs, reflecting the overarching ideas in the music itself. The disc explores the heartbreak of shattered childhood promises of a better world and concludes with optimistic hope.

“Devour is about that inherent American appetite,” Hause says. “It’s in all the songs in some degree. There’s a reason why Tony Soprano became such a huge American icon – he’s this guy with this insane appetite for women and food and power. I think for the American public to latch onto a figure like that says something. Some of the positive things about America come from that as well, but there’s a real sense of reckoning that comes from devouring everything in front of you. Is it ever enough?”